st. andrews community college laurinburg nc - ChemistryEssaydatesCom

st. andrews community college laurinburg nc

st. andrews community college laurinburg nc

admin/ August 6, 2018/ chemistry

A Link to Facebook    

Inquire Visit Apply Give Online

  • Home
  • About
    • Photo Galleries
    • Faculty Directory
    • Staff Directory
    • Department | Office Directory
    • Public Relations
    • Our History
    • Scottish Heritage
    • St. Andrews Archives
    • Church Relations
    • Directions
    • Employment Opportunities
    • Accreditation
    • Giving to St. Andrews
  • Academics
    • Majors & Programs
    • Master of Business Administration
    • Academic Calendar
    • Academic Catalog
    • Study Abroad Program
    • Registrar (Transcripts)
    • The General Honors Program
    • The Bookstore
    • DeTamble Library
  • Admissions
    • Meet the Admissions Staff
    • First Year Students
    • Transfer Students
    • Fall 2018 Academic Advising
    • International Students
    • Sandhills Program
    • MBA Admissions
    • Financial Aid
    • Business Office
    • Required New Student Forms
  • Equestrian
  • Student Life
    • Prospective Students
    • Current Students
    • Orientation
    • Campus Safety
  • Alumni
    • Alumni Giving
    • Alumni Directory
    • Alumni Council
    • St. Andrews by the Lake
    • 2016-2017 Donor Roll
  • Athletics

History

History

Find a graphical history by clicking this link.

In September 1961, the first students stepped onto the grounds of a spacious, lake-centered campus that only a short time earlier had been named St. Andrews Presbyterian College. Long before the arrival of those first students, Presbyterians across North Carolina, laity and clergy, had committed themselves to this new adventure in higher education.

The history of St. Andrews began in 1896 with the founding of Flora Macdonald College in Red Springs, NC. In 1958, Flora Macdonald College merged with Presbyterian Junior College in Maxton, NC to establish St. Andrews. In 1996, St. Andrews celebrated the Centennial Anniversary of its heritage by hosting a series of events and celebrations. In honor of the occasion, 800 plus alumni, faculty, students, staff and friends, gathered for this birthday party to recognize the shared history of the three institutions.

The founding of St. Andrews, a project of the Synod of North Carolina of the Presbyterian Church in the US, began in the early 1950s as a way to strengthen Presbyterian higher education in the eastern region of the state where the need was the greatest. One of the more difficult early decisions was where to locate the new college. Nearly every important city in the region sought the college, made pledges and offered land. After careful consideration of nineteen proposals, the Board of Trustees on March 6, 1956, chose Laurinburg in Scotland County as the city that met most fully the 28 selection guidelines. At the time, Consolidated College was used as a temporary name for the new institution.

Central to the history of St. Andrews is the early settlement of Scotland and surrounding counties by the Highland Scots who immigrated up the Cape Fear River in the 18th century. These settlers valued education highly and had established a number of educational institutions that were eventually absorbed directly or indirectly into St. Andrews. When the new college opened, a significant portion of faculty and students at St. Andrews came from Flora Macdonald College and Presbyterian Junior College.

Academic planning, the vital work shaping the heart of the institution, got off to an impressive start, establishing from the very beginning important academic programs that soon would thrust the new college onto the frontier of quality liberal arts education. The Board of Trustees appointed a panel of outstanding educators to study the purpose and curriculum of the consolidated college. The panel issued a document called the “Chapel Hill Report” in the summer of 1957 that led to the formation of the widely acclaimed Christianity and Culture program. This innovative interdisciplinary curriculum in the liberal arts remained for many years the most distinctive feature of St. Andrews Presbyterian College. When the College opened in 1961, its strongest asset was a splendid core curriculum that attracted the attention of educators throughout the nation.

On April 15, 1959, a groundbreaking ceremony, held at what is now the east end of Lake Ansley Moore, marked the beginning of the construction of the physical plant on the 800-acre site south of Laurinburg. A college administration was formed. Dr. Ansley C. Moore was named President, joining Business Manager Silas M. Vaughn who had already been employed by the College. The first Dean of the College, Dr. Price Gwynn of Flora Macdonald College, soon joined them. All these appointments were made by the Board of Trustees, chaired by Mr. Hector MacLean, a prominent banker from nearby Lumberton who provided the College with strong vigorous leadership during these crucial early years. On September 23, 1960, The Board of Directors named the new institution St. Andrews Presbyterian College.

Almost exactly one year later, on September 22, 1961, the College opened with 750 students. The first classes met at eight o’clock in the morning followed by the first Opening Convocation. Although construction continued, ten buildings had been completed in splendid modern forms accented by rows of ancient Celtic crosses. The Academic Building and the Vardell Building were located on the south campus. On the north campus were the Student Center, a maintenance building, and six residence halls named for presbyteries in the Synod of North Carolina. A large central area had been turned into a quiet lake whose nearly equal parts were separated by a long causewalk. Two men’s dormitories, DeTamble Library, and the Physical Education Center would be built before the decade closed.

The campus was designed to be largely barrier-free, permitting the College to move quickly to the forefront of service and research in the education of physically disabled students. Long before it became a legal imperative to design and convert facilities to accommodate the wheelchair, St. Andrews pioneered in serving the educational needs of students with physical disabilities.

The most distinctive and successful of all programs at St. Andrews in its first years was the Christianity and Culture Program, known as “C&C.” During the most successful years of “C&C,” students in the freshmen and sophomore courses studied ancient and modern civilization, emphasizing European trends. The junior year was given to the study of non-Western cultures. The senior year included a course in American studies and a final course in studies of the future. During each summer for many years, C&C was also taught abroad with students and a team of instructors traveling and studying in Israel, Greece and Rome.

Continuing in the tradition of a team-taught interdisciplinary core curriculum, St. Andrews introduced in 1969 a two-term course in the natural sciences. Selected Topics in Modern Science, known as STMS, was offered at the freshman level and was required of all students. STMS developed into a widely acclaimed interdisciplinary course that pioneered relating the scientific disciplines to one another. Taught by a carefully recruited team of scientists, STMS quickly became one of the finest introductory science courses in the nation. To house STMS and other interdisciplinary courses, two unique facilities were especially designed according to curriculum needs. The Morgan-Jones Science Center and Avinger Auditorium were completed in 1970.

St. Andrews could look back upon a first decade of truly remarkable achievement. In ten short years, the College had become a national leader in undergraduate liberal arts and science education. Enrollment had grown to more than 900, with a nearly equal balance between men and women. More than half of these students came from outside North Carolina, reflecting the national reputation of St. Andrews. Scholars and educators from every region of the country and even from abroad came to the campus to study the highly successful curriculum in the liberal arts and natural sciences and to view the science complex as a model undergraduate teaching facility.

The momentum of the 1960s unfortunately could not be sustained during the next decade. During the early 1970s, St. Andrews faced the same difficulties experienced by private institutions of higher education throughout the nation. Campus unrest stemming from the unpopular Vietnam war, the rising cost of education, and the traumatic economic recession, coupled with the foreign oil embargo, all contributed to serious difficulties experienced by independent colleges in the 1970s. Despite financial struggles, decreased enrollment, and reductions in faculty, the College refused to retreat from its commitment to high-quality undergraduate education. Changing student needs led to the replacement of the Christianity and Culture Program with the new St. Andrews Studies Program (SAS). This change, along with the carefully planned revisions in some major programs, enabled the College to continue to offer high-quality instruction during these difficult years when resources were extremely scarce. The College, in fact, strengthened many of its academic programs during these hard times.

In the late 1970s, the physical plant of the College underwent further changes, including making buildings more fuel-efficient. Important structures were added and overdue renovations were made. The Student Center was renovated, redecorated, and named the William Henry Belk College Center. The Katherine McKay Belk Tower was built on Chapel Island as a 16-bell carillon, dominating the center of campus. Kings Mountain dormitory was fully renovated in 1978, renamed Pate Hall, and made into a continuing education center, reflecting the College’s concern for adult education and service to the community and the churches of the Synod of North Carolina in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

In 1978, following discussions with the Department of Public Instruction officials in Raleigh, St. Andrews began its 21-year service as the campus for the Governor’s School East, a special summer program for gifted and talented high school students in North Carolina.

In 1980 and 1981, the core programs of the College were revised to incorporate into the curriculum the best elements of the former C&C, SAS, and STMS programs. The new St. Andrews General Education Program, called SAGE, restored a historical component to the general college program, in keeping with the College’s concern for international studies. The SAGE program also broke new ground in curriculum development by introducing interdisciplinary studies bridging the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Academic majors were also strengthened in areas where student demand for services had increased, especially in mathematics, computer science, psychology, the natural sciences, and business administration.

The St. Andrews international programs provide many opportunities to students who choose to travel and study abroad during their four years at the College. St. Andrews hosts regular terms at the University Cuenca in Ecuador; and Brunnenburg Castle in the Italian Alps. St. Andrews was only the second college in the United States to send a group of students to Vietnam. A variety of short trips to destinations such as Cuba, Greece, Mexico, South Africa, Scotland, England, France and India have rounded out the summer offerings. The international program takes the same interdisciplinary approach, as do programs throughout the St. Andrews curriculum. Each year St. Andrews enjoys students from other countries—among them, England, Canada, Korea, Zimbabwe, and Ecuador—who live and study on the Laurinburg campus.

In 1990, St. Andrews extended its commitment to high-quality education to adult students through a satellite program at nearby Sandhills Community College in Pinehurst. The St. Andrews at Sandhills program offers junior and senior level courses in the evenings and on weekends, enabling students with job and family responsibilities to complete four-year degrees. The St. Andrews-at-Sandhills program enjoyed significant enrollment increases each year until Fall 2007 when a decline began.

In 2007, St. Andrews further extended its commitment to adult students through the online programs designed to provide degree and certificate options. Shortly following the beginning of the online programs, the educational opportunities for adult learners were consolidated into the Center for Adult and Professional Studies (CAPS) and the online and satellite programs are currently housed and administered there.

In 2009 St. Andrews formally aligned itself to aggressively recruit military personnel. St. Andrews gained membership in the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges Consortium (SOC) and received national recognition as a military-friendly institution. Military students, or their dependents, may be traditional campus or CAPS students and access a variety of military related education benefits.

For more than 40 years, the internationally acclaimed St. Andrews Press has presented a unique window on the world for readers and writers through its publications. The St. Andrews Press began publishing in 1972. Since then it has published over 200 books (about 85 still in print), many of which have received praise from those in a position to recognize and appreciate literary quality. The special character of the Press has been its commitment to introduce new or unknown writers to a larger audience, and to showcase and enhance the stunning vitality of the “grass-roots” literary culture of America, as well as, provide tremendous experiential opportunities for students. Since the average life span of a small press is two to three years, the Press’s more than forty years of continuous publication is a rare distinction. Samuel Tallmadge Ragan, late Poet Laureate of North Carolina said of the college and the Press: “St. Andrews has earned a splendid reputation for its liberal arts and especially its writing program, of which the St. Andrews Press is a crown jewel.” Additionally, the weekly Fortner Writers’ Forum provides a venue for writers and performers with large and appreciative audiences, and has welcomed readers such as Tom Wolfe and James Dickey.

The Scottish Heritage Center and the St. Andrews Pipe Band are logical extensions of the College’s Scottish Heritage. The Scottish Heritage Center was created in the fall of 1989 to highlight and preserve Scottish heritage as well as to honor individuals rendering outstanding service to the preservation of Scottish heritage. In 1996 the Center was moved into the DeTamble Library, and in 2009 relocated to its own building on campus, where it houses a collection of rare materials related to Scottish-American history, genealogy, traditions, and culture. It is also the home of the Fiona Ritchie Radio Archive for the well-known National Public Radio program “The Thistle and Shamrock.” The St. Andrews Pipe Band, with pipers and drummers from all over the nation, continues to be an award-winning band noted as one of the top bands in the eastern United States. In 1998 the band recorded an album of music that has been featured on National Public Radio as well as the BBC Radio in Scotland. A second CD was produced in 2002. The band took top honors in Division III competition in 2006 of the Eastern United States Pipe Band Association.

The St. Andrews Equestrian Program is a national leader in the development of educated horsewomen and horsemen. The academically oriented program offers a tremendous diversity of experience for the novice horse lover, serious competitor, or the career-oriented equestrian. St. Andrews is a national leader in combining riding with academic excellence. The Therapeutic Riding degree, begun in 1996, was the first undergraduate degree of its kind in the country. The St. Andrews Equestrian Team continues to be national champions by winning the ANRC in 1996, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2007. St. Andrews hosted the national ANRC championships in 2002 and 2006, as well as hosted the Intercollegiate Dressage Association in 2006. St. Andrews finished second in the 2006 ANRC championships. The Western Program boasts four IHSA Regional Championships (2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009) and four IDA National Final Qualifications (2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005).

Over the years St. Andrews has received recognitions in various national publications, in both books and periodicals, which drew attention to the quality of the college’s academic programs and the opportunities afforded to its students.

In 1989, St. Andrews was cited in the book, Colleges That Enable. This was the first in a series of recent national recognitions of the overall quality of the total St. Andrews educational experience that has continued unabated. In the following year, 1990, St. Andrews was profiled in the book, Looking Beyond the Ivy League. In 1996, the college was featured in a third book, Colleges That Change Lives. The introduction tells its student readers: “Any one of the 40 colleges profiled here will do at least as much as, and usually far more than, an Ivy League school, an Ivy clone, or a major research university to give you a rich, full life, and to make you a winner.” Focusing specifically on St. Andrews, it says: “It can truly claim to be a value-added place. The track records of its graduates bear witness.”

It was 1996 that the college first appeared in U. S. News & World Report. Each year since that first appearance (1996- 2010), this well-known publication has continuously ranked St. Andrews in the Fourth Tier among the nation’s best liberal arts schools. Other national recognition has continued in publications such as the following:The Princeton Review (2000-2009), Colleges of Distinction (2003-2009), and The Washington Post (2003) “20 Undiscovered Gems”.

St. Andrews was praised in Harvard Schmarvard: Getting Beyond the Ivy League to the College that is Best for You, by Jay Mathews (Crown Publishing Group, 2003). It says: “Strong students will find that they can develop meaningful relationships with their Ph.D. professors and learn more of a graduate school method than an undergraduate.”

The history of St. Andrews offers a consistent record of academic innovation, recognitions and accomplishments far out of proportion to the college’s small size and limited human and financial resources. It has repeatedly demonstrated an ability to recognize needs which were not being met by the prevalent higher education cannon of pedagogical strategies, texts, programs or assumptions. It has also combined its visionary thinking with successful academic planning to translate insights into concrete, efficacious higher education innovation.

In 2011 Webber International University and St. Andrews Presbyterian College received approval to merge the two institutions and St. Andrews became a branch of Webber International University. In the Fall of 2011 St. Andrews Presbyterian College became St. Andrews University, a branch of Webber International University. As part of the transition from college to university, St. Andrews offered its first graduate level program, the Master of Business Administration program, starting in Fall of 2012.

For over 50 years, St. Andrews has provided students with a close-knit educational environment that is a little different from other small liberal arts and science schools. At St. Andrews, what you learn both inside and outside the classroom creates a sense of intellectual and social engagement that will empower you to make a difference in your community, in your profession, and in the world. 

Webber International University History

On April 6, 1927, Grace Knight and Roger W. Babson founded the University which carries the name of their granddaughter, Camilla Grace Webber. Roger was best known for his contributions in the areas of economics and finance, which included the establishment of Babson’s Reports and authorship of a number of business publications and books. His philanthropic contributions included the formation of several institutions of higher learning and service on a number of corporate boards, as well as the endowment of several charitable foundations. Webber was founded as a women’s college, with the exclusive purpose of teaching women about business. It was the first school chartered under the educational and charitable laws of the State of Florida as a non-profit organization. Originally the Babson Park campus was only used for the Spring term, while fall classes were taught in Boston. In 1940, Babson Park became the University’s permanent campus and our student body became co-ed in 1971. Our campus is situated on the shore of beautiful Crooked Lake and in addition to our classroom and administration buildings, we have a Student Union, four dormitories, two gymnasiums, a state of the art fitness center and a conference center. Webber is a member of the NAIA and the Florida Sun Conference. Webber women participate in soccer, volleyball (indoor and beach), basketball, tennis, softball, cross-country, golf, track and field and bowling. Men compete in cross-country, soccer, basketball, tennis, baseball, golf, track and field, football and bowling. In addition to our traditional undergraduate program, we proudly offer a Master of Business Administration degree program with emphasis in Accounting, International Business, Security Management, and Sport Management. We also offer an adult education program. Webber will continue to propagate the ideals envisioned by its founders. Built upon a solid legacy of experience and knowledge, Webber will prepare tomorrow’s business leaders to meet the challenges of the future by instilling a desire for innovative thought and creative accomplishment.

More About Us

History
Campus Bookstore
Consumer Information Guide
Achievement Data
Campus Map
Faculty/Staff Directory
Communications  
Organizational Chart 
Employment  
Policies
Scottish Heritage        
Quality Enhancement Plan
Giving To St. Andrews   
Accreditation  
Archives

Events


  • August 21, 2018

    First Day of Classes


  • September 29, 2018

    Open House and Football Tailgate


  • October 19, 2018

    Equestrian Open House

Subscribe to this RSS feed

  • Home
  • About
    • Photo Galleries
    • Faculty Directory
    • Staff Directory
    • Department | Office Directory
    • Public Relations
    • Our History
    • Scottish Heritage
    • St. Andrews Archives
    • Church Relations
    • Directions
    • Employment Opportunities
    • Accreditation
    • Giving to St. Andrews
  • Academics
    • Majors & Programs
    • Master of Business Administration
    • Academic Calendar
    • Academic Catalog
    • Study Abroad Program
    • Registrar (Transcripts)
    • The General Honors Program
    • The Bookstore
    • DeTamble Library
  • Admissions
    • Meet the Admissions Staff
    • First Year Students
    • Transfer Students
    • Fall 2018 Academic Advising
    • International Students
    • Sandhills Program
    • MBA Admissions
    • Financial Aid
    • Business Office
    • Required New Student Forms
  • Equestrian
  • Student Life
    • Prospective Students
    • Current Students
    • Orientation
    • Campus Safety
  • Alumni
    • Alumni Giving
    • Alumni Directory
    • Alumni Council
    • St. Andrews by the Lake
    • 2016-2017 Donor Roll
  • Athletics

St. Andrews University (North Carolina)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to navigation
Jump to search

This article needs additional citations for verification . Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources . Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2011) ( Learn how and when to remove this template message )
St. Andrews University
St. Andrews Univesity School Seal.png
Type Private
Established1896
Affiliation Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
Endowment $12.8 million [1]
President Paul Baldasare, Jr., J.D.
Academic staff
64 [1]
Students600
Undergraduates 600
Location Laurinburg , NC , US
CampusSuburban 940 acres (380.4 ha)
Colors Blue and white
Nickname Knights
Affiliations NAIA ( AAC ) (as of 2012-13)
Website http://www.sa.edu/

St. Andrews University, a branch of Webber International University, formerly St. Andrews Presbyterian College, [2] is a private, Presbyterian , four-year liberal arts college in Laurinburg , in the U.S. state of North Carolina . The university was established in 1958 as a result of a merger of Flora MacDonald College In Red Springs and Presbyterian Junior College and was named St. Andrews Presbyterian College from 1960 until 2011 when the college changed its name to St. Andrews University. That same year, the college entered into a merger with Webber International University of Babson Park, Florida . The current campus president is Paul Baldasare, who was named by the Board of Trustees in December 2006. It is also home to the St. Andrews Press. In 2013, St. Andrews added its first graduate program, an MBA in business administration. [3]

Contents

  • 1 History
    • 1.1 Early history
    • 1.2 Recent history
  • 2 Campus
  • 3 Academics
  • 4 Accreditation
  • 5 Athletics
    • 5.1 Men’s sports
    • 5.2 Women’s sports
  • 6 References
  • 7 External links

History[ edit ]

Early history[ edit ]

The institution was founded in 1958, established as a result of the merger of Flora MacDonald College in Red Springs (est. 1896) and Presbyterian Junior College in Maxton (est. 1928). [4] The new college was named St. Andrews Presbyterian College on September 23, 1960. [4] The name reflected its Scottish Presbyterian heritage and identified it with the University of St Andrews in Scotland . [4] A groundbreaking ceremony was held on April 15, 1959, followed shortly by construction of a campus on an 800-acre location on the south side of Laurinburg . [4] St. Andrews held an opening convocation and classes began on September 22, 1961 with 750 students. [4] Unusual for its time, the campus was designed to be accessible and barrier-free to students with physical disabilities. Ten buildings had been completed by the opening of the college in 1961, including the Academic Building and the Vardell Building, Student Center, a maintenance building, and six residence halls named for presbyteries in the Synod of North Carolina. [4]

Enrollment grew to over 900 by 1970, and the college saw expansion of facilities and curriculum in its first ten years. [4] Two additional men’s dorms, the DeTamble Library, and the Physical Education Center were completed in the late 1960s, and the Morgan-Jones Science Center and Avinger Auditorium were completed in 1970. [4]

In its early years the college developed the Christianity and Culture Program, or “C&C” for short. The program focused on interdisciplinary curriculum that provided freshman and sophomore level courses in ancient and modern civilization, junior level courses in non-Western cultures, and senior level courses in American studies. The program also included study abroad options in Israel, Greece and Rome. [4] St. Andrews introduced Selected Topics in Modern Science, known as STMS, in 1969. [4] First offered as a required freshman level two-term course in natural sciences, the STMS developed into a broad interdisciplinary program that connected various scientific disciplines to one another. [4] The college began the St. Andrews Press in 1972. [4]

The college experienced a number of changes during the early 1970s. St. Andrews, along with many other colleges across the United States, experienced political and social unrest on campus stemming from the unpopular Vietnam War coupled with the rising cost of education, the economic recession, and the 1973 oil crisis . [4] To combat financial struggles and decreased enrollment, St. Andrews replaced the Christianity and Culture Program with a new program known as the St. Andrews Studies Program (SAS). [4]

In the late 1970s, the Student Center was renovated and named the William Henry Belk College Center. The Katherine McKay Belk Tower was built on Chapel Island at the center of campus. [4] St. Andrews renovated the Kings Mountain dormitory in 1978, renamed it Pate Hall, and made into a continuing education center to accommodate an expanding adult education program. [4]

In the early 1980s, St. Andrews redesigned its core programs, incorporating curriculum elements of the former C&C, SAS, and STMS programs. [4] The new St. Andrews General Education Program, called SAGE, focused on general education curriculum with interdisciplinary courses in humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. St. Andrews also expanded academic majors in the areas of mathematics, computer science, psychology, the natural sciences, and business administration. [4]

From 1978 until 1999, St. Andrews was the site of the Governor’s School of North Carolina ‘s East campus.

Recent history[ edit ]

In 1990, St. Andrews added a satellite program at Sandhills Community College in Pinehurst to meet additional demand for the college’s adult education program. [5] St. Andrews-at-Sandhills began offering junior and senior level courses in the evenings and on weekends. [4] In 2007, St. Andrews added online programs designed to provide degree and certificate options. [4] The college also consolidated the adult program, online program, and satellite program into the Center for Adult and Professional Studies (CAPS).

In 2009 St. Andrews formally became a member of the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges Consortium (SOC) and received national recognition as a military-friendly institution. [4]

In July 2011, following accreditation issues, St. Andrews and Webber International University announced a merger of the two institutions. [6] With the merger, St. Andrews became an additional instructional location of, and a branch of, Webber International. Webber is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) to award degrees at the associate, bachelor and master’s levels. [6] The merger combined Webber’s focus on business programs, four MBA degrees and extensive online options with St. Andrews’ focus on undergraduate liberal arts and science programs. [6]

In September 2011, the college’s president, Paul Baldasare, Jr., class of 1977, [7] announced the intention to change the name to “St. Andrews University” during the campus’ Founders’ Day celebration. [8] Baldasare cited increased enrollment goals as well as plans to add graduate programs and expand online programs for adult learners as major reasons for the name change. [8]

Campus[ edit ]

Lake scene, looking north

The campus is located south of downtown Laurinburg, bounded on the west by U.S. Routes 15 and 401 . There is a lake in the middle of campus.

On the southern side of the campus is the Morgan-Jones Science Building, Avinger Auditorium, the Morgan Liberal Arts Building, the DeTamble Library, and the Vardell Building. There is a bridge from one side of the lake to an island to the other side of the lake. On the island is the campus bell tower.

On the northern side of the campus is the Willam Henry Belk student center, where the Crossroads Cafeteria, student store, student mailboxes, and Office of Student Affairs are located. On the east side of this end of campus are four dorms, Concord, Granville, Wilmington, and Albemarle. On the west side are four more dorms, Winston-Salem, Pate, Mecklenburg, and Orange. Pate houses the Student Health & Wellness Center. Across from the Belk Center is the P.E. Building. On the far north end of campus, there are the athletic fields. The Equestrian Center is located off campus, approximately 2 miles south.

The campus was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2016.

Academics[ edit ]

St. Andrews offers three bachelor’s degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Fine Arts. It was one of the first institutions to implement a B.F.A. program for Creative Writing.

The student-faculty ratio is low, 12:1, resulting in small classes and a personalized education.[ citation needed ]

St. Andrews offers non-traditional students the opportunity to pursue degrees in Business Administration, Equine Business Management, Elementary Education, Liberal Studies, and courses leading to teacher certification, in an online, traditional classroom or blended format. In the fall of 2008 the college organized its degree offerings at Sandhills Community College (St. Andrews @ Sandhills), its online program and its other opportunities for non-traditional learners, under the umbrella of the St. Andrews Center for Adult and Professional Studies.

St. Andrews has charters with the following honor societies: Alpha Chi , Beta Beta Beta , Omicron Delta Epsilon , Pi Gamma Mu , Psi Chi , Sigma Tau Delta , Sigma Beta Delta , and the St. Andrews Honor Society. St. Andrews also offers an honors program, which selects incoming freshmen based on their high school GPA, SAT/ACT scores, and an interview with the director of the program.

Accreditation[ edit ]

In 1961, St. Andrews Presbyterian College was first accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC). [9] In June 2007, SACSCOC voted to remove the college’s accreditation “for failure to meet accreditation standards dealing with financial resources, stability, and control.” [10] St. Andrews appealed the decision, but the commission’s College Delegate Assembly upheld the decision to terminate accreditation. [10] The college responded by filing a lawsuit against the association, but the judge granted the motion for summary judgment filed by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, directed that judgment be entered in favor of the association, and dismissed the lawsuit filed by St. Andrews. [10]

In April 2011, Webber International University filed a substantive change form to add St. Andrews Presbyterian College as an additional instructional location, providing a merger for the two institutions. Following the filing, the accreditation of St. Andrews was extended through July 31, 2011 to allow for SACSCOC to render a decision on the application during the annual meeting. [11] During the June 2011 SACSCOC meeting, the association approved the plan by Webber International University to add St. Andrews as an additional instructional location. This merger of Webber International University and St. Andrews resolved the accreditation concern with SACSCOC. [12]

In addition, the college is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education .[ citation needed ] The college is a member of North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities, the Association of Presbyterian Colleges, the Council of Independent Colleges, and the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs. The college’s women graduates qualify for membership in the American Association of University Women.[ citation needed ]

Athletics[ edit ]

Main article: St. Andrews University Knights

St. Andrews’ athletic teams are known as the Knights. The university offers 19 intercollegiate sports in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), primarily competing in the Appalachian Athletic Conference (AAC) starting in the 2012-13 academic year. [13] St. Andrews was formerly a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division II level, primarily competing in Conference Carolinas from 1988 to 2012. [13] The university transitioned to the NAIA after 23 years in the NCAA at the end of the 2011-12 academic year. [13]

Men’s sports[ edit ]

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross-country
  • Equestrian
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Volleyball
  • Wrestling

Women’s sports[ edit ]

  • Basketball
  • Cross-country
  • Equestrian
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Volleyball

In addition to the 19 NAIA sports, St. Andrews sponsors an extensive Equestrian program. The St. Andrews Equestrian Team has won American National Riding Commission (ANRC) national champions in 1996, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2007. [4] The Knights finished Reserve Champion at the ANRC Intercollegiate National Championships in 2004 and 2006. [14] The program has won two Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) Zone Hunter Seat All-Star Championships in 2002 and 2004; six IHSA Hunter Seat Reserve Regional Team Championships in 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007; six IHSA Western Regional Team Championships in 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011; and qualified for the Intercollegiate Dressage Association (IDA) National Final eight times in 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2009, and 2010). [14]

References[ edit ]

  1. ^ a b “Quick Facts” . St. Andrews University. Archived from the original on October 17, 2011. Retrieved October 25, 2011. 
  2. ^ Staff (September 27, 2011). “St. Andrews Presbyterian College to become St. Andrews University” . Fayetteville Observer . Retrieved October 25, 2011. 
  3. ^ St. Andrews Press Archived 2006-02-05 at the Wayback Machine .
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v “The History of St. Andrews University” . St. Andrews University. Archived from the original on August 10, 2014. Retrieved October 25, 2011. 
  5. ^ Staff (October 19, 2011). “Miles Named Director of St. Andrews Sandhills Program” . The Pilot . Archived from the original on September 19, 2012. Retrieved October 25, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b c Staff (July 8, 2011). “St. Andrews-Webber University Merger Approved” . The Pilot . Archived from the original on February 5, 2013. Retrieved October 25, 2011. 
  7. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20140227063659/http://www.sapc.edu/directory/admin/administrationstaffdirectory.php . Archived from the original on 2014-02-27.  Missing or empty |title= ( help )
  8. ^ a b Staff (September 23, 2011). “St. Andrews to Become a University” . The Pilot . Archived from the original on February 4, 2013. Retrieved October 25, 2011. 
  9. ^ “St. Andrews Presbyterian College” . Southern Association of Colleges and Schools . 2011. Retrieved 2011-04-14. [ permanent dead link ]
  10. ^ a b c “Update on the Accreditation Status of St. Andrews Presbyterian College” (PDF). Southern Association of Colleges and Schools . December 10, 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 5, 2011. Retrieved 2011-04-14. 
  11. ^ “St. Andrews accreditation continued through end of July” . Archived from the original on 2011-08-09. 
  12. ^ “SACS approves Webber and St. Andrews Plan” . Archived from the original on 2011-06-28. 
  13. ^ a b c Smith, Matt (October 24, 2011). “St. Andrews makes shift to NAIA” . Laurinburg Exchange . Archived from the original on December 23, 2011. Retrieved October 25, 2011. 
  14. ^ a b “St. Andrews Equestrian Program” . St. Andrews University. Archived from the original on November 16, 2004. Retrieved October 25, 2011. 

External links[ edit ]

  • St. Andrews website
  • St. Andrews Athletics website
  • Presbyterian Junior College yearbooks, 1933-1961
  • v
  • t
  • e
Private colleges and universities in North Carolina
  • Barber-Scotia
  • Barton
  • Belmont Abbey
  • Bennett
  • Brevard
  • Campbell
  • Catawba
  • Charlotte Christian
  • Chowan
  • Davidson
  • Duke
  • Elon
  • Gardner–Webb
  • Greensboro
  • Guilford
  • High Point
  • Johnson C. Smith
  • John Wesley
  • Lees–McRae
  • Lenoir–Rhyne
  • Livingstone
  • Louisburg
  • Mars Hill
  • Meredith
  • Methodist
  • Mid-Atlantic Christian
  • Montreat
  • Mount Olive
  • North Carolina Wesleyan
  • Pfeiffer
  • Piedmont International
  • Queens
  • St. Andrews
  • St. Augustine’s
  • Salem
  • Shaw
  • Southeastern Baptist
  • Southeastern Free Will Baptist
  • Warren Wilson
  • Wake Forest
  • William Peace
  • Wingate
  • v
  • t
  • e
Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities
  • Agnes Scott
  • Alma
  • Arcadia
  • Austin
  • Barber-Scotia
  • Belhaven
  • Blackburn
  • Bloomfield
  • Buena Vista
  • Carroll
  • Centre
  • Coe
  • College of Idaho
  • College of the Ozarks
  • College of Wooster
  • Davidson
  • Davis and Elkins
  • Eckerd
  • Grove City
  • Hampden–Sydney
  • Hanover
  • Hastings
  • Illinois College
  • Inter American
  • Jamestown
  • Johnson C. Smith
  • King
  • Lake Forest
  • Lees-McRae
  • Lindenwood
  • Lyon
  • Macalester
  • Mary Baldwin
  • Maryville
  • Millikin
  • Missouri Valley
  • Monmouth
  • Muskingum
  • William Peace
  • Presbyterian
  • Queens University of Charlotte
  • Rhodes
  • Rocky Mountain
  • Schreiner
  • St. Andrews
  • Sterling
  • Stillman
  • Trinity
  • Tusculum
  • University of Dubuque
  • University of Pikeville
  • University of Tulsa
  • University of the Ozarks
  • Warren Wilson
  • Waynesburg
  • Westminster (Missouri)
  • Westminster (Pennsylvania)
  • Westminster (Utah)
  • Whitworth
  • Wilson College (Pennsylvania)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Appalachian Athletic Conference
  • Allen University
  • Bluefield College
  • Brenau University
  • Bryan College
  • Columbia College
  • Milligan College
  • Montreat College
  • Point University
  • Reinhardt University
  • St. Andrews University
  • SCAD Atlanta
  • Tennessee Wesleyan University
  • Truett McConnell University
  • Union College

Coordinates : 34°44′43″N 79°28′43″W / 34.7454°N 79.4786°W / 34.7454; -79.4786

Retrieved from ” https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=St._Andrews_University_(North_Carolina)&oldid=849212034 ”
Categories :

  • Universities and colleges in North Carolina
  • Education in Scotland County, North Carolina
  • Educational institutions established in 1958
  • Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
  • Universities and colleges accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
  • Universities and colleges affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (USA)
  • Buildings and structures in Scotland County, North Carolina
  • 1958 establishments in North Carolina
  • Appalachian Athletic Conference schools
  • Liberal arts colleges in North Carolina
  • National Register of Historic Places in Scotland County, North Carolina
  • School buildings on the National Register of Historic Places in North Carolina
Hidden categories:

  • Webarchive template wayback links
  • Pages with citations lacking titles
  • Pages with citations having bare URLs
  • All articles with dead external links
  • Articles with dead external links from May 2018
  • Articles with permanently dead external links
  • Articles needing additional references from April 2011
  • All articles needing additional references
  • All articles with unsourced statements
  • Articles with unsourced statements from April 2011
  • Articles with unsourced statements from October 2011
  • Coordinates on Wikidata

Navigation menu

Personal tools

  • Not logged in
  • Talk
  • Contributions
  • Create account
  • Log in

Namespaces

  • Article
  • Talk

Variants

    Views

    • Read
    • Edit
    • View history

    More


      Navigation

      • Main page
      • Contents
      • Featured content
      • Current events
      • Random article
      • Donate to Wikipedia
      • Wikipedia store

      Interaction

      • Help
      • About Wikipedia
      • Community portal
      • Recent changes
      • Contact page

      Tools

      • What links here
      • Related changes
      • Upload file
      • Special pages
      • Permanent link
      • Page information
      • Wikidata item
      • Cite this page

      Print/export

      • Create a book
      • Download as PDF
      • Printable version

      Languages

      • اردو
      Edit links

      • This page was last edited on 7 July 2018, at 10:05 (UTC).
      • Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License ;
        additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy . Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. , a non-profit organization.
      • Privacy policy
      • About Wikipedia
      • Disclaimers
      • Contact Wikipedia
      • Developers
      • Cookie statement
      • Mobile view
      • Wikimedia Foundation
      • Powered by MediaWiki